Quality Coding
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Joy! Xcode 10 Promises to Improve Test-Centric Workflows

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Every WWDC, I hope for improvements to unit testing — but have learned to expect disappointment. So at WWDC 2018, I was surprised to have my low expectations thwarted! Xcode 10 brings changes that will improve my test-centric workflow.

For several years, Apple’s changes for test support have underwhelmed me. They focused on:

  • Xcode Bots (…I tried them. I gave up.)
  • Performance tests (…My code is not performance-critical.)
  • UI tests (…I don’t write any.)

With Test-Driven Development, unit tests run locally are my primary tool. The features above may have helped some people, but I wasn’t one of them.

So what did WWDC 2018 bring me? Here’s what I see on the horizon with Xcode 10.

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Do You Refactor without Tests? It’s Time for Safety

When you refactor, do you have unit tests covering you? …If not, why not? …If so, how do you know?

To me, it seems that the state of refactoring has gotten worse across the industry. Both managers and programmers and managers say the word “refactoring” more than ever. But they almost always mean, “I’m going to change a bunch of stuff. Then at the end, we need to make sure I didn’t break anything.”

But that’s not refactoring. That’s rewriting.

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How to Improve Code Comments with Little Refactorings

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Does your code have comments? Sometimes they’re helpful. But most of the time…

Disclosure: The book links below are affiliate links. If you buy anything, I earn a commission, at no extra cost to you.

As Jeff Atwood explains, code tells you how, comments tell you why. A well-placed code comment is a level above the code itself, explaining why something is written the way it is. But! We can express most comments as code, using well-named identifiers. The first edition of  the Refactoring book called this Introduce Explaining Variable. Martin Fowler has since renamed that refactoring to Extract Variable.

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How Many Code Smells Can You See in This Short Method?

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It’s time for a quick exercise in code smells!

How many code smells do you see below?

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The 3 Laws of TDD: Focus on One Thing at a Time

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When I was first learning TDD, I’d try to get to the First Step (a failing test) by writing a fully-formed test. But it often took a lot fiddling to get that test to run and fail. Sometimes this was because the production code took several steps to set up. Sometimes it was because the test code wasn’t right.

One of the tricky parts of TDD is that we’re creating two streams of code in parallel: the test code, and the production code. Two things changing at the same time… that’s a hard thing to keep in your head!

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My Crazy Plans for the New Year (Book Teaser)

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Happy new year! It seems like good time for a Quality Coding retrospective. I also want to share some goals for 2018.

…Did someone say, “Are you writing a book?”

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How to Mock Standalone Functions in Swift

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We’ve looked at ways to mock methods in Swift. But what about standalone functions? Is there a way to mock them as well?

Yes! Not only can we mock Swift standalone functions, but we can do it without changing the call sites.

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How to Use SwiftLint for Clean, Idiomatic Swift

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We get feedback from the compiler. We get feedback from Test-Driven Development. But what sources of feedback lie in between?

This is where linters come in. A linter goes beyond “Does the code compile?” A linter answers questions like, “Is the code idiomatic? Is it stylistically clean? Are there any red flags?”

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Incorrect TDD: What Can We Learn From It?

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A paper published in 2013 about Test-Driven Development included the following diagram. Unfortunately, it gets some things wrong:

A tweet from Nat Pryce sparked discussion:

First, let me say I’m happy to see more studies on TDD. The thrust of this particular study is that TDD can be soft on negative tests. That is, maybe the code works for good data, but it’ll break on bad data.

TDD is a development discipline, so I’m all for learning more from traditional testing disciplines. I certainly don’t want to discourage folks from doing studies and writing papers.

But. Let’s first make sure we’re doing proper TDD, shall we? Otherwise any studies, especially studies about efficacy, may be flawed.

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Where Will Jon Be in Fall 2017?

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Do you enjoy conferences and workshops? Here’s my conference schedule for this fall:

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