Fix Swift tearDown Methods with This AppCode Plugin

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Those of you who are regular visitors to qualitycoding.org may have already read Jon’s article outlining the life cycle of XCTestCase objects during the execution of a test suite. If you haven’t, or you want to refresh your memory, take a moment to read the original article.

Jon discusses the importance of the setUp and tearDown methods. And, more specifically, why we should be deallocating our properties in the tearDown method.

Writing a tear down method is one of those repetitive tasks. It follows a specific pattern: all properties should be set to nil. It doesn’t really require any brain power. It’s just one of those annoying tasks that you have to remember to do when writing a test.

It’s tasks like this that should be automated. And now with the Swift tear down inspection AppCode plugin, we can.

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Please Take My 2017 Reader Survey

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I want to ensure my platform does the best possible job of answering your needs and interests. And that means I need to know more about you. To do that, I’ve created my 2017 Reader Survey.

feedback

Would you please take a few minutes to fill out the survey? By doing so, you will ultimately be helping yourself. Why? Because you will be helping me create content even more interesting and relevant to you.

Your input is important to me. The survey is easy to fill out, and the results are completely anonymous. I can’t tell who said what. And you can finish in five minutes.

Yes, I’m Happy to Help. Take Me to the Survey!

Thanks in advance for your help.

Generate Test Scaffolding & Stay Focused

Quickly generate code for either Swift or Objective-C. Code snippets provided for both Xcode and AppCode.

Refactoring: Is There More To It than Just Changing Stuff?

Refactoring. It’s a word I hear quite a bit. Usually, in the context of conversations with management, it means, “Rewriting that thing. Hopefully without introducing bugs.” Often, among developers, it means, “One of the options in the Refactoring menu in my IDE.”

Inigo Montoya meme: "Refactoring, you keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
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Revealing Hidden Objects: Can DDD Improve Your Code?

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Code that’s easier to understand, maintain, and extend — that’s the promise of Object-Oriented Programming. But the reality for many iOS developers is that our objects are bloated. They know too much, and do too much. What if our code has hidden objects, waiting to be found?

Each hidden object could provide a new abstraction, a new tool. They could make the code more manageable. Is there a way to discover these hidden objects? Domain Driven Design (DDD) provides a way.

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How to Make Swift Mock Objects More Useful

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I’ve written about my experience of going to try! Swift Tokyo 2017. Now thanks to the video and transcript provided by Realm, I can also share the talk I gave: “Making Mock Objects More Useful”.

Speaking at try! Swift Tokyo on Swift Mock Objects

I start by showing the basics of how to make a mock object by hand. But this easily leads to fragile tests because the assertions are overspecified. We need ways to make tests more malleable, with mocks that are more flexible.

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How to Safely Parse JSON into Immutable Models, All with TDD

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How can we unit test JSON parsing, handling every possible error? Can we generate immutable models? And for Swift, how can we keep our Response Models free of optionals?

Of course, there areb many JSON parsing libraries out there. Plug one in, define all fields as non-optional, and you’re good to go! …Until your app crashes, because something was different in the actual JSON data.

Unlikely? “The backend team would never do that to us”? I’ve had a released app crash because the backend folks changed one field from a string to an integer. I’ve seen app development and QA forced to pause because a commit assumed all fields were non-optional. (It crashed on the missing field, because Swift.)

So let’s look at a pattern that will help us

  • Handle required types
  • Avoid optionals
  • Deliver immutable models

Even if you never plan to do your own parsing, we’ll learn things along the way about design and testing.

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Love Swift? Want to Visit Charming / Quirky Japan?

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If you’re interested in Swift development, and want to visit Japan, start making plans to go to the next try! Swift conference in Tokyo. It was my privilege to be a speaker earlier this month.

Let me share my impressions of the conference, and why you might consider making the trip there.

(But first, a side-note about this blog: Sorry I’ve been so quiet lately! I was spending my time preparing for try! Swift Tokyo 2017. Next up is CocoaConf Chicago, where I’ll be leading a TDD workshop in addition to giving a talk. But I’ve also continued to TDD a JSON parsing example, in both Objective-C and Swift versions, so I have plenty to blog about. To make sure you don’t miss any new articles, you can sign up to get updates via email.)

Logo

Riko

“Riko”, the official logo of try! Swift Tokyo

First, let me point out the conference’s logo/mascot. The Swift bird has never been so adorable! Without a doubt, this is the cutest tech conference logo I’ve ever seen.

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Let’s Stop Overusing Swift Equatables in Unit Tests

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Enumerations with associated values are my favorite feature of Swift. But how can we write unit tests against them? “Make them Equatable and use XCTAssertEqual” is common advice.

I’m here to argue otherwise. In fact, let’s use this as a jumping-off point to discuss Swift Equatables in unit tests.

Apples and oranges: Sometimes you shouldn't care about Swift equatable testing

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In Defense of Uncle Bob’s Dark Path: Swift and Testability

Uncle Bob set off another firestorm with his blog post The Dark Path. Condemnation from the Swift programming community was, well, swift. How dare he insult our wonderful new language? Clearly he’s a n00b who hasn’t done enough Swift programming.

Emperor Palpatine: "Good, good, let the hate flow through you"

Except that he’s no n00b — not even close. As Mark Seemann said,

I’m here to defend Uncle Bob’s post, as it relates to unit testing and TDD.

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JSON Parsing: One of the Easiest Places for TDD beginners

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How can we use Test-Driven Development for JSON parsing? Most developers are concerned with ways to implement the production code. There are various approaches, various libraries… But what about the unit test side of things?

If we write effective unit tests, the design can appear incrementally. And with a strong suite of tests, you’re free to change the implementation — even radically. When the results are guaranteed by tests, whatever approach you take or library you use becomes an implementation detail!

Last time, we looked at design principles, such as sticking to the Single Responsibility Principle and returning a Response Model. This time, let’s look at:

  • Test principles
  • A TDD demo in Objective-C

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